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Deer.io takedown: Russian citizen jailed for selling stolen sensitive information of US citizens online

A Russian citizen may be jailed for 30 months for his role in selling stolen debit card information along with other data helpful to fuel further criminal activity.

Kirill Victorovich Firsov, 30, from Moscow, acted for the reason that administrator of an internet site that provided stolen personal data and other services to be played with for cybercrime, a US Department of Justice release states.

One-stop cybercrime platform

As previously reported by The Daily Swig, the now-defunct website – Deer.io – hosted an estimated 2,000 illicit internet vendors making it approximately $17 million during its seven-year operation.

It sold information including gamer account logins, as well as personal information of US citizens not limited to names, current addresses, contact numbers, and world market darknet at times Social Security numbers.

Deer.io was released since October 2013 and was shut down following Firsov’s arrest in March 2020 after an operation where the FBI purchased 1,100 gamer accounts and the personal data for upwards of 3,600 Americans.

The prosecutor asserted that Firsov knew deer.io was selling stolen and counterfeit accounts because he built the platform.

“Also, deer.io was easily searchable, so anyone – including Firsov – could search prestashop for stolen US accounts and knowledge,” the making reads.

“Though it sold stolen accounts, deer.io had not been cloaked in secrecy and required no special password for access, because everything was deplete all of your Russia, and American the police could gain no foothold.”

‘Sending a message’

“The FBI will pursue cybercriminals across the globe,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge, Suzanne Turner.

“Today’s sentence sends a message – conducting criminal activity from external the United States doesn’t mean you might be out of reach.

“The FBI will identify and pursue criminal actors inside the cyber-sphere, where ever they operate, and try to bring these to justice inside a United States court.”

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Deer.io takedown: Russian citizen jailed for selling stolen personal information of US citizens online

A Russian citizen may be jailed for 30 months for his role in selling stolen debit card information along with data used to fuel further criminal activity.

Kirill Victorovich Firsov, 30, from Moscow, acted because the administrator of a website that provided stolen private information and various services to be utilized for cybercrime, a US Department of Justice release states.

One-stop cybercrime platform

As previously reported by The Daily Swig, the now-defunct website – Deer.io – hosted around 2,000 illicit internet retailers making approximately $17 million during its seven-year operation.

It sold information including gamer account logins, as well as the private data of US citizens not restricted to names, current addresses, contact numbers, at times Social Security numbers.

Deer.io was launched since October 2013 and was turn off following Firsov’s arrest in March 2020 after an operation when the FBI purchased 1,100 gamer accounts and the private information for more than 3,600 Americans.

The prosecutor asserted that Firsov knew deer.io was selling stolen and counterfeit accounts as he built the platform.

“Also, deer.io was easily searchable, so anyone – including Firsov – could search the woking platform for stolen US accounts and knowledge,” the production reads.

“Eventhough it sold stolen accounts, deer.io wasn’t cloaked in secrecy and required no special password for access, because everything was exhaust Russia, and American police force could gain no foothold.”

‘Sending a message’

“The FBI will pursue cybercriminals around the world Market url (https://wiki.berkeleymorris.Org/User:ZacharyTrost27),” said FBI Special Agent in Charge, Suzanne Turner.

“Today’s sentence sends a message – conducting criminal activity from outside the United States doesn’t imply that you are away from reach.

“The FBI will identify and pursue criminal actors inside cyber-sphere, wherever they operate, and work to bring those to justice in the United States court.”

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US authorities are offering $10 million for info on nation-state cyber-attacks

US authorities are offering as much as $10 million in cryptocurrency for information leading to the identification of state-sponsored cyber-attackers.

Beneath the scheme, which happens beneath the Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program, payouts will be awarded for the identity or location of anybody who, “while acting at the direction or underneath the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against US critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

A press release states that violations include threats made during ransomware attacks, unauthorized access to a protected computer with intention to steal sensitive data, and intentionally causing damage without authorization to a protected computer.

This system has setup a reporting channel accessible on the dark web to greatly help protect the safety and security of potential sources.

“Reward payments may include payments in cryptocurrency,” said the Department of State.

More information on how best to access the Tor-based reporting channel is found in the release.

In the pipeline

The offer of an incentive comes since the US continues to see cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure which have caused chaos throughout the nation.

In May in 2020, a ransomware attack on gas supplier Colonial Pipeline take off services to multiple states on the east coast.

Attackers leveraging DarkSide malware demanded $4.3 million in bitcoin – a sum that has been reportedly paid out by the company.

Security professionals previously told The Daily Swig that in paying ransoms, organizations risk perpetuating a “feedback loop of malicious activity” that “allows the groups to reach a larger degree of sophistication during their next attacks, world market onion (ghtmadcxt.preview.infomaniak.website) whether that be via training, new tooling, purchasing credentials, or recruitment.

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US authorities are offering $10 million for informative data on nation-state cyber-attacks

US authorities are offering up to $10 million in cryptocurrency for information ultimately causing the identification of state-sponsored cyber-attackers.

Under the scheme, which happens beneath the Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program, payouts will undoubtedly be awarded for the identity or location of anybody who, “while acting at the direction or beneath the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against US critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

A media release states that violations include threats made during ransomware attacks, unauthorized usage of a protected computer with intention to steal sensitive data, and intentionally causing damage without authorization to a protected computer.

The program has set up a reporting channel accessible on the dark web to greatly help protect the safety and security of potential sources.

“Reward payments may include payments in cryptocurrency,” said the Department of State.

Additional information on the best way to access the Tor-based reporting channel are available in the release.

In the pipeline

The offer of an incentive comes whilst the US continues to have cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure that have caused chaos throughout the nation.

In May this year, a ransomware attack on gas supplier Colonial Pipeline cut off services to multiple states on the east coast.

Attackers leveraging DarkSide malware demanded $4.3 million in bitcoin – a sum which was reportedly paid out by the company.

Security professionals previously told The Daily Swig that in paying ransoms, organizations risk perpetuating a “feedback loop of malicious activity” that “allows the groups to achieve a better degree of sophistication throughout their next attacks, whether that be via training, new tooling, purchasing credentials, world market onion or recruitment.

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Kaseya denies ransomware payment since it hails ‘100% effective’decryption tool

Kaseya has denied rumors that it paid a ransom to the REvil cybercrime gang because it continues to roll out a decryptor to victims of a recently available ransomware attack.

The program supply chain attack, which began on July 2, is believed to have affected up to 1,500 organizations via the hack of IT management platform Kaseya VSA.

Kaseya revealed on July 22 so it had obtained a decryption tool from a “third party” and was working to restore the environments of impacted organizations with assistance from anti-malware experts Emsisoft.

Speculation

The update sparked speculation regarding identity of the unnamed 3rd party, with Allan Liska of Recorded Future’s CSIRT team positing a disgruntled REvil affiliate, the Russian government, or that Kaseya themselves had paid the ransom.

The theory that the universal decryptor key became available as a result of police action was strengthened on July 13 once the dark web domains connected with REvil abruptly went offline.

However, some experts also said it was likely that this was a prelude to REvil, whose other notable scalps include Travelex and meat supplier JBS, rebranding itself in a bid to dodge law enforcement.

Non-disclosure agreement

The cybercrime outfit was believed to have initially demanded a payment of $70 million from Kaseya, before lowering the price tag to $50 million.

Kaseya, which includes reportedly granted organizations access to the decryptor world market darknet contingent on signing a non-disclosure agreement, addressed rumors that it had paid a ransom in a statement yesterday (July 26):

Recent reports have suggested that our continued silence on whether Kaseya paid the ransom may encourage additional ransomware attacks, but nothing could possibly be further from our goal. While each company must make a unique decision on whether to pay for the ransom, Kaseya decided after consultation with experts never to negotiate with the criminals who perpetrated this attack and we have not wavered from that commitment. As a result, we are confirming in no uncertain terms that Kaseya didn’t pay a ransom – either directly or indirectly through an alternative party – to acquire the decryptor.

Kaseya said that “the decryption tool has proven 100% able to decrypting files that have been fully encrypted in the attack&rdquo ;.

It added: “We continue to provide the decryptor to customers that request it, and we encourage all our customers whose data could have been encrypted during the attack to reach out to your contacts at Kaseya&rdquo ;.

More zero-days

A week ago, meanwhile, security researchers from the organization that unearthed the zero-day Kaseya vulnerabilities exploited by REvil disclosed a trio of additional zero-day flaws in another Kaseya product.

The Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure (DIVD) advised users of cloud-based Kaseya Unitrends, which is available as an add-on for Kaseya VSA, to not expose the service to the net until a patch was released.

Also last week, Huntress Labs released a post speculating on why the compromise of 60 upstream, managed supplier customers using a fake software update hadn’t had much more calamitous consequences.

Dismissing the idea that Kaseya’s system shutdown was the primary reason, security researcher John Hammond pondered, among other potential reasons, whether threat actors had learned “from previous incidents (like Colonial Pipeline) that a much larger impact might invite government intervention?”

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Kaseya denies ransomware payment as it hails ‘100% effective’decryption tool

Kaseya has denied rumors so it paid a ransom to the REvil cybercrime gang because it continues to roll out a decryptor to victims of a recent ransomware attack.

The software supply chain attack, which began on July 2, is believed to possess affected up to 1,500 organizations via the hack of IT management platform Kaseya VSA.

Kaseya revealed on July 22 so it had obtained a decryption tool from a “third party” and was trying to restore the environments of impacted organizations with the aid of anti-malware experts Emsisoft.

Speculation

The update sparked speculation regarding identity of the unnamed third party, with Allan Liska of Recorded Future’s CSIRT team positing a disgruntled REvil affiliate, the Russian government, or that Kaseya themselves had paid the ransom.

The idea that the universal decryptor key became available because of law enforcement action was strengthened on July 13 once the dark web domains associated with REvil abruptly went offline.

However, some experts also said it absolutely was likely that this is a prelude to REvil, whose other notable scalps include Travelex and meat supplier JBS, world market onion rebranding itself in a bid to dodge law enforcement.

Non-disclosure agreement

The cybercrime outfit was believed to own initially demanded a payment of $70 million from Kaseya, before lowering the selling price to $50 million.

Kaseya, which has reportedly granted organizations use of the decryptor contingent on signing a non-disclosure agreement, addressed rumors that it had paid a ransom in a statement yesterday (July 26):

Recent reports have suggested which our continued silence on whether Kaseya paid the ransom may encourage additional ransomware attacks, but nothing could possibly be further from our goal. While each company must make its own decision on whether to pay for the ransom, Kaseya decided after consultation with experts not to negotiate with the criminals who perpetrated this attack and we’ve not wavered from that commitment. As a result, we’re confirming in no uncertain terms that Kaseya didn’t pay a ransom – either directly or indirectly through an alternative party – to obtain the decryptor.

Kaseya stated that “the decryption tool has proven 100% able to decrypting files which were fully encrypted in the attack&rdquo ;.

It added: “We continue to offer the decryptor to customers that request it, and we encourage all our customers whose data could have been encrypted throughout the attack to reach out to your contacts at Kaseya&rdquo ;.

More zero-days

The other day, meanwhile, security researchers from the business that unearthed the zero-day Kaseya vulnerabilities exploited by REvil disclosed a trio of additional zero-day flaws in another Kaseya product.

The Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure (DIVD) advised users of cloud-based Kaseya Unitrends, which is available as an add-on for Kaseya VSA, to not expose the service to the internet until a patch was released.

Also last week, Huntress Labs released a post speculating on why the compromise of 60 upstream, managed service provider customers using a fake software update hadn’t had a lot more calamitous consequences.

Dismissing the idea that Kaseya’s system shutdown was the primary reason, security researcher John Hammond pondered, among other potential reasons, whether threat actors had learned “from previous incidents (like Colonial Pipeline) that a bigger impact might invite government intervention?”

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Kaseya denies ransomware payment as it hails ‘100% effective’decryption tool

Kaseya has denied rumors that it paid a ransom to the REvil cybercrime gang since it continues to roll out a decryptor to victims of a current ransomware attack.

The program supply chain attack, which began on July 2, is believed to possess affected up to 1,500 organizations via the hack of IT management platform Kaseya VSA.

Kaseya revealed on July 22 that it had obtained a decryption tool from a “third party” and was working to restore the environments of impacted organizations with the help of anti-malware experts Emsisoft.

Speculation

The update sparked speculation regarding identity of the unnamed alternative party, world market url with Allan Liska of Recorded Future’s CSIRT team positing a disgruntled REvil affiliate, the Russian government, or that Kaseya themselves had paid the ransom.

The idea that the universal decryptor key became available due to police force action was strengthened on July 13 when the dark web domains related to REvil abruptly went offline.

However, some experts also said it absolutely was likely that this was a prelude to REvil, whose other notable scalps include Travelex and meat supplier JBS, rebranding itself in a bid to dodge law enforcement.

Non-disclosure agreement

The cybercrime outfit was believed to own initially demanded a payment of $70 million from Kaseya, before lowering the asking price to $50 million.

Kaseya, which includes reportedly granted organizations use of the decryptor contingent on signing a non-disclosure agreement, addressed rumors so it had paid a ransom in a statement yesterday (July 26):

Recent reports have suggested that our continued silence on whether Kaseya paid the ransom may encourage additional ransomware attacks, but nothing could possibly be further from our goal. While each company must make its decision on whether to pay the ransom, Kaseya decided after consultation with experts not to negotiate with the criminals who perpetrated this attack and we’ve not wavered from that commitment. Therefore, we are confirming in no uncertain terms that Kaseya did not pay a ransom – either directly or indirectly through an alternative party – to obtain the decryptor.

Kaseya said that “the decryption tool has proven 100% capable of decrypting files that were fully encrypted in the attack&rdquo ;.

It added: “We continue to provide the decryptor to customers that request it, and we encourage all our customers whose data may have been encrypted throughout the attack to reach out to your contacts at Kaseya&rdquo ;.

More zero-days

A week ago, meanwhile, security researchers from the business that unearthed the zero-day Kaseya vulnerabilities exploited by REvil disclosed a trio of additional zero-day flaws in another Kaseya product.

The Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure (DIVD) advised users of cloud-based Kaseya Unitrends, which can be acquired as an add-on for Kaseya VSA, not to expose the service to the net until a patch was released.

Also last week, Huntress Labs released a post speculating on why the compromise of 60 upstream, managed company customers using a fake software update hadn’t had a lot more calamitous consequences.

Dismissing the proven fact that Kaseya’s system shutdown was the primary reason, security researcher John Hammond pondered, among other potential reasons, whether threat actors had learned “from previous incidents (like Colonial Pipeline) that a much larger impact might invite government intervention?”

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Deer.io takedown: Russian citizen jailed for selling stolen information that is personal of US citizens online

A Russian citizen has become jailed for 30 months for his role in selling stolen plastic card information and various data accustomed to fuel further criminal activity.

Kirill Victorovich Firsov, 30, from Moscow, acted since the administrator of a website that provided stolen sensitive information along with services to be played with for cybercrime, a US Department of Justice release states.

One-stop cybercrime platform

As previously reported by The Daily Swig, the now-defunct website – Deer.io – hosted a projected 2,000 illicit online stores making it approximately $17 million during its seven-year operation.

It sold information including gamer account logins, plus the information that is personal of US citizens not limited by names, current addresses, contact numbers, and at times Social Security numbers.

Deer.io was launched as small as October 2013 and was banned following Firsov’s arrest in March 2020 after an operation in which the FBI purchased 1,100 gamer accounts along with the information that is personal for upwards of 3,600 Americans.

The prosecutor asserted that Firsov knew deer.io was selling stolen and counterfeit accounts as he built the platform.

“Also, deer.io was easily searchable, so anyone – including Firsov – could search the system for stolen US accounts and knowledge,” the making reads.

“Just about the most sold stolen accounts, deer.io hasn’t been cloaked in secrecy and required no special password for access, because everything was deplete all of your Russia, and American law enforcement could gain no foothold.”

‘Sending a message’

“The FBI will pursue cybercriminals worldwide,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge, Suzanne Turner.

“Today’s sentence sends a message – conducting criminal activity external the United States does not necessarily mean that you are out from reach.

“The FBI will identify and world market darknet pursue criminal actors in the cyber-sphere, wherever they operate, and work to bring the crooks to justice inside a United States court.”

The Death Of World Market Darknet And How To Avoid It

Kaseya denies ransomware payment because it hails ‘100% effective’decryption tool

Kaseya has denied rumors that it paid a ransom to the REvil cybercrime gang as it continues to roll out a decryptor to victims of a current ransomware attack.

The software supply chain attack, which began on July 2, is believed to own affected around 1,500 organizations via the hack of IT management platform Kaseya VSA.

Kaseya revealed on July 22 that it had obtained a decryption tool from a “third party” and was attempting to restore the environments of impacted organizations with the help of anti-malware experts Emsisoft.

Speculation

The update sparked speculation regarding the identity of the unnamed 3rd party, with Allan Liska of Recorded Future’s CSIRT team positing a disgruntled REvil affiliate, the Russian government, or that Kaseya themselves had paid the ransom.

The theory that the universal decryptor key became available due to police force action was strengthened on July 13 when the dark web domains related to REvil abruptly went offline.

However, some experts also said it had been likely that this is a prelude to REvil, whose other notable scalps include Travelex and meat supplier JBS, rebranding itself in a bid to dodge law enforcement.

Non-disclosure agreement

The cybercrime outfit was believed to own initially demanded a payment of $70 million from Kaseya, before lowering the price tag to $50 million.

Kaseya, which includes reportedly granted organizations access to the decryptor contingent on signing a non-disclosure agreement, addressed rumors so it had paid a ransom in a record yesterday (July 26):

Recent reports have suggested which our continued silence on whether Kaseya paid the ransom may encourage additional ransomware attacks, but nothing could be further from our goal. While each company must make a unique decision on whether to pay for the ransom, Kaseya decided after consultation with experts not to negotiate with the criminals who perpetrated this attack and we’ve not wavered from that commitment. Therefore, we are confirming in no uncertain terms that Kaseya did not pay a ransom – either directly or indirectly through an alternative party – to obtain the decryptor.

Kaseya said that “the decryption tool has proven 100% with the capacity of decrypting files which were fully encrypted in the attack&rdquo ;.

It added: “We continue to provide the decryptor to customers that request it, and we encourage all our customers whose data might have been encrypted throughout the attack to reach out to your contacts at Kaseya&rdquo ;.

More zero-days

The other day, meanwhile, security researchers from the organization that unearthed the zero-day Kaseya vulnerabilities exploited by REvil disclosed a trio of additional zero-day flaws in another Kaseya product.

The Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure (DIVD) advised users of cloud-based Kaseya Unitrends, which is available as an add-on for Kaseya VSA, world market darknet not to expose the service to the internet until a patch was released.

Also the other day, Huntress Labs released a blog post speculating on why the compromise of 60 upstream, managed company customers with a fake software update hadn’t had a lot more calamitous consequences.

Dismissing the indisputable fact that Kaseya’s system shutdown was the principal reason, security researcher John Hammond pondered, among other potential reasons, whether threat actors had learned “from previous incidents (like Colonial Pipeline) that a bigger impact might invite government intervention?”

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US authorities are offering $10 million for info on nation-state cyber-attacks

US authorities are offering around $10 million in cryptocurrency for information ultimately causing the identification of state-sponsored cyber-attackers.

Under the scheme, which takes place under the Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program, payouts is likely to be awarded for the identity or location of anyone who, “while acting at the direction or beneath the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against US critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

A media release states that violations include threats made during ransomware attacks, unauthorized access to a protected computer with intention to steal sensitive data, and intentionally causing damage without authorization to a protected computer.

This system has setup a reporting channel accessible on the dark web to greatly help protect the safety and security of potential sources.

“Reward payments may include payments in cryptocurrency,” said the Department of State.

More info on how best to access the Tor-based reporting channel is found in the release.

In the pipeline

The offer of a reward comes whilst the US continues to experience cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure that have caused chaos throughout the nation.

In May this year, a ransomware attack on gas supplier Colonial Pipeline cut off services to multiple states on the east coast.

Attackers leveraging DarkSide malware demanded $4.3 million in bitcoin – a sum which was reportedly paid out by the company.

Security professionals previously told The Daily Swig that in paying ransoms, organizations risk perpetuating a “feedback loop of malicious activity” that “allows the groups to reach a greater degree of sophistication during their next attacks, whether that be via training, world market darknet (www.dom-ita.com) new tooling, purchasing credentials, or recruitment.