Sick And Tired of Doing World Market Darknet The Outdated Method? Read This

Administrators of the biggest English speaking forum TOR1 started a new project to combat Darknet criminals. The 2nd of March was the day they launched a new R. Search engine (something similar to Google) that allows users to look for illicit items from multiple Darknet Markets at once. In the end, illegal information will be easier to locate for any cybercriminal.

A brief explanation for Darknet newcomers This is the reason why the Darknet isn’t like the normal web. You don’t have a main website like Google or Bing that let you look up the entire darknet. To access any website, you must to know the exact URL or address. There are forums available to assist you in your search on the dark net, but to enter they must be aware that they exist. There have been attempts to create an official search engine in order to assist in the search for illegal actions. Of course, comparing Google with R. search engines is an enormous reduction. With Google you can explore the entire Clearnet but with R. search, we’re able to search the only darknet markets (DNM) with TOR and not all of them.

Very similar to Google

The idea of the idea of Darknet world market link (DNM) search engine to look through the offers of various stores is not new. What is unique are the people behind it. The group is comprised composed of moderators and administrators “D. forum” the largest discussion forum in the English language sphere of TOR it was launched in February 2018 in response to the broader removal of Darknet related subjects on Reddit. D. became one of the primary information hubs on TOR. When you’re looking for opinions on DNM, specific DNM vendors, or new fraud techniques or aren’t sure where you can purchase something, that forum is the first destination for a lot of Darknet users visit. The same is true for people who are looking for instructions about what to do to prevent fraud the latest services offered by DNM as well as the latest news in the Darknet or anything related to it, frauds, drugs , or any other illegal activity. In this forum, you will find numerous sections that clearly discuss illegal activity such as Fraud Carding, Fraud, Fraud Resources, Counterfeiting, Dark Markets, Fake ID, counterfeit Money, LSD, Drug Manufacture, Malware, Hacking, etc.

Each big DNM and every popular type of drug or fraud has its own section. Also, there are sections for certain nations, currencies, and popular TOR websites. Only pedophilia, pro-terrorism, weapons, poisons and other related subjects are banned. Beyond that, there’s full freedom of speech.

The creators of D. Forum are already one of the most prominent vendors in the English speaking areas of TOR and enjoy a good reputation. This is the reason why opening R. search could offer the forum a new purpose. To highlight the link between the well-known forum R. search needs you to sign in from D. forum in order to sign-up on R. search. This is even obligatory when you’re an DNM vendor and wish to update information about you on R. search. There is no given information regarding whether R. the search engine collects information about users searches and their preferences. We all know that Google utilizes search history to profile users on the internet. What if you and the D. team can make the same feature, and profile which of its users are interested in which kinds of illegal activities? There may be a myriad of tools to gather more information on Darknet users who want to stay secretive.

The appearance is R. search

R. search appears appealing (in contrast in comparison to the others Darknet websites) and is very user-friendly. It offers basic filters that include: minimum and maximum prices, shipping country, Darknet Markets. At the time of writing this piece, R. the search engine indexes 23,7 million vendors, 61 thousand listings (that’s what we call “offers” in the context of DNM) and 1 million reviews by DNM users. Currently, R. search contains just 6 active DNM and archive information about DNM that have already been removed. The most important thing to consider is how the new DNMs are added and who decides on it. D. Forum team is trying to create a database consisting of only the most reliable DNM vendors, without scammers. Of course, it’s their own determination as to which DNM are reliable enough to be included in the database, and which are not. Thanks to that the role of the group in the Darknet infosphere is becoming more and more significant.

A significant feature is that R. search includes in its database archived data from shut DNMs. Markets on the Darknet change in their direction, and sellers often need to move from one location to another. Their market data usually do not appear in the new market and buyers need to trust the vendors’ claims that they are trustworthy, reliable etc. Thanks to R. search, customers can examine the reputation of vendors who were in the old DNMs. R. search has a very unique type of search engine in which it is possible to find vendors using their PGP fingerprints or their public PGP Key2. Because of this, if somebody claims to be Mr. X and he had outstanding scores on DNM’s that are dead, one can verify whether Mr. X on these dead DNM had the identical PGP Key. PGP Key is the main way for Darknet users to authenticate themselves.

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Researchers Spot New Cryptocurrency Stealing Malware Advertised Under a Subscription Model

A cryptocurrency-related malware program has been advertised on world market darknet forums as the “leading way to make money in 2021,” raising alarms among the cybersecurity community. Palo Alto Networks published a report about the malicious app Westeal and outlined the creator’s ties with other types of malware that steals major streaming services accounts.

Westeal Claims to Be Immune Against Major Antivirus Software

According to the company that deals in cybersecurity, “Westeal” is an evolution from “Wesupply Crypto Stealer,” another malicious crypto software that has been in circulation in May of this year. Research suggests that Wesupply’s evolution is being advertised since February 2021.

The study shows that Westeal was created to steal bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH) entering and out victim’s wallet through their clipboard.

Furthermore, those who download the malicious application gain access to a web-based panel that handles all operations that are required, including a “victim tracker panel.”

One of the things that has raised concerns by Palo Alto Networks is the fact that Westeal is reportedly immune to major antivirus software.

The malware works with a subscription model, and “Complexcodes,” the anon author of the app, earns money by charging 20 euros ($24) every month fifty euro ($60) over three consecutive months, and 125 euros ($150) per year.

The Malware Is a ‘Shameless’ Crypto Stealer, Researchers Say

The cybersecurity company provides more details on the malware:

“In the effort to “steal” cryptocurrency from a victim, Westeal uses regular expressions to look for strings matching the patterns of bitcoin and ethereum wallet identifiers being copied to the clipboard. When it matches these, it replaces the copied wallet ID in the clipboard with one supplied by the malware. The victim then pastes the substituted wallet ID for a transaction, and the funds are sent instead to the substitute wallet.”

Still, Palo Alto Networks qualifies Westeal as a “shameless” malware:

“Westeal is a shameless piece of commodity malware with a single, illicit function. Its simplicity is matched by a likely simple effectiveness in the theft of cryptocurrency. The low-sophistication actors who purchase and deploy this malware are thieves, no less so than street pickpockets. Their crimes are as real as their victims. The fast and simple monetization chain and anonymity of cryptocurrency theft, together with the low cost and simplicity of operation, will undoubtedly make this type of crimeware attractive and popular to less-skilled thieves.”

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Changes in the perception of intelligence agencies regarding crypto-related crimes will be the first step in a successful crypto investigation.

While the value of cryptocurrencies has fluctuated wildly over the last year, this does not mean that it is less attractive to criminals. A lot of them are moving their illegal activities underground and away from the eyes of law enforcement. Because of the public nature of the majority of blockchains the rapid growth should not be of concern to law enforcement agencies. With the right tools and knowledge tracking the proceeds of crimes that are fueled by crypto is actually not as difficult as it seems.

However, intelligence agencies should be equipped with a crypto investigation plan that is equipped with the right tools to lawfully collect digital evidence and properly equipped personnel to conduct investigations into the occurrence of these kinds of crimes. they are discovered.

Digital Intelligence (DI) is the result of two components: the data collected from digital sources and data types (think smartphones computers, computers, and the cloud) and the way agencies can access to, manage, and get information from the data in order to effectively run investigations. For law enforcement to investigate security related to crypto, it should be equipped with the proper tools and expertise to move these investigations forward. If investigators are aware of what they’re looking for and are equipped with the proper tools and skills to analyze and follow those signals, crypto can appear more like an “invisible” web and more like the DI investigations that the investigative teams use to.

According to an investigation into the enforcement of cryptocurrency by the United States Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force within the Department of Justice, crypto-based criminals fall into three categories:

1. The use of cryptocurrency as a way to pay for crimes

Bitcoin (BTC) became brought into the world media because of a number of significant, international criminal investigations related to the darknet back in 2013. In 2013, Bitcoin was the sole form of currency available on the dark web. After several successful government seizures computer hackers created Monero (XMR), Dash, Zcash (ZEC) and other privacy coins designed to obfuscate the public ledger, which makes it more difficult for law enforcement to track and take assets.

Businesses that are legitimate typically don’t use the darknet to sell goods or services, but this doesn’t mean that the products aren’t available in the darknet. Stolen goods, counterfeit products and copies of software that have stolen activation keys can be located with massive discounts.

Businesses also face the risk of losing information. Selling bank accounts, employee records data, customer records, and other confidential data is among the most lucrative ways that criminals make money on the darknet. In 2019, cybersecurity firm CipherTrace discovered the majority of products and services offered by darknet vendors during the year were derived from stolen payment products of financial institutions that were compromised.

The most efficient and fastest method to find these criminals is to use advanced crypto trackers and analytics programs.

2. Financial fraud and money laundering business

Criminals earn money through unlawful activities like the sale of drugs, fraud human trafficking or the trafficking of weapons They require a means to convert the illicit funds so that they appear legitimate. This is known as “money laundering.”

Due to its ease of use and pseudo-anonymity, crypto-money laundering is quickly becoming a major method of transfer and laundering of money. Within minutes, crypto-currency can be moved across the world or converted into another cryptocurrency or traded in exchange for real assets.

3. Criminality involving crypto on crypto

Certain criminals who are involved in crypto choose to focus their efforts on cryptocurrency consumers and exchanges.

In 2018 Three North Korean military hackers -arrested in January 2021 successfully stolen and extorted more $1.3 billion of fiat currency and cryptocurrency from banks as well as companies. As the Assistant Attorney General John Demers said:

“North Korea’s operatives, using keyboards rather than masks and guns, are the world’s leading 21st-century nation-state bank robbers.”

In 2020, around $1.5 billion in value was lost as a result of fraud and misappropriation, According to the report of CipherTrace’s “2020 Cryptocurrency Crime and Anti-Money Laundering Report.” The DeFi-related crime only continues to rise quarter over quarter.

These kinds of investigations create many challenges for both the private and public sectors. The technology behind the cryptocurrency market is complex and fast-changing. So, it is no surprise that police agencies have a difficult time keeping up to date with the latest security patches and hardware in order to efficiently solve cases.

It is evident that the use of crypto is not just an overnight phenomenon, since the interest in cryptocurrency has drastically increased. Law enforcement may be tracking certain crypto wallets or addresses, which could lead to the identification of an individual who is responsible for the transactions. New developments in digital intelligence give the investigative teams the ability to visualize transactions and trace virtual paper trails that can identify evidence regarding individuals who commit criminal acts.

Education and training is the crucial

One of the primary difficulties for law enforcement when dealing with crypto is perception. Cryptocurrency is still in its early stages and changing, so people perceive it as complicated and therefore, training and education are critical. Investigators and agencies must have the right skills to maximize strategies and methods, however, it may be difficult for police command staff to appreciate the value of cryptocurrency-related training since the types of investigations that are available are not new to law enforcement.

Agencies had to overcome the same obstacle in the past decade, when command staff did not feel cell phone investigations were crucial. There were many teams that did not pursue mobile devices due to the lack of the tools and training necessary for proper cell phone data analysis. Today, almost every crime has some relation to a cell phone. In the near future, virtually all financial crimes will be linked to a relationship to crypto, because cryptocurrency is the future of money.

New investigative tools

The second layer is comprised of investigative tools. They are tools that use physical components to gather data from devices as well as software utilized to analyze the collected data. To develop the most effective tools for crypto analysts, teams need solutions built around a full blockchain search engine that gathers massive amounts of data points to track the addresses of cryptocurrency through exchanges, dark market, and ATMs that accept crypto.

The new solutions that are on the market give teams the ability to discover cryptocurrency artifacts in order to act for “leads” to start a blockchain study.

Technology advancements in cryptocurrency have pushed experienced criminals underground which means that law enforcement involvement is minimal, and the likelihood of being caught are minimal. Law enforcement must now prepare to design a complete, end-to-end investigative strategy that focuses on information, tools and services. Digital intelligence is essential to determining what went wrong and then preparing for the next incident and it is imperative that all DI strategies are backed by World Market Onion-class tools specifically designed for crypto.

With the growth in use and popularity of cryptocurrencies, agencies should also be looking to bring their DI expertise into the company and bringing in knowledgeable experts. It’s a dual-step solutionagencies require both knowledge and the appropriate equipment to respond appropriately to the occurrences that involve crypto. These are the foundational elements to build a robust DI strategy. Crypto can be traced back to different kinds of crimes, from financial fraud to drug, wildlife and human trafficking making it a fundamental element of DI investigations. And while becoming the new method of payment the technology behind cryptocurrency can help speed up the investigation procedures.

In order to tackle these new challenges, you need the advancement in law enforcement equipment, education, and strategies based on DI as well as data analysis. The final word is that the cryptocurrency is here to stay police and other law enforcement organizations must take the necessary steps today to be ready for the rise in cryptocurrency-related crimes that are bound to grow more commonplace with the increasing popularity of cryptocurrencies. But crypto is just the tool of criminals since money has always been. However, it is an instrument for law enforcement agencies as well.

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Researchers Spot New Cryptocurrency Stealing Malware Advertised Under a Subscription Model

A cryptocurrency-related malware program has been advertised on darknet forums as the “leading way to make money in 2021,” raising alarms among the cybersecurity community. Palo Alto Networks published a report on the malware app Westeal and outlined the creator’s ties with other types of malware that robs major streaming services accounts.

Westeal Claims to Be Immune Against Major Antivirus Software

According to the cyber security company, “Westeal” is an development of “Wesupply Crypto Stealer,” another malicious crypto application that has been in circulation for sale since the month of May in 2020. Research suggests that Wesupply’s evolution is being advertised since February 2021.

The study suggests that Westeal was created to capture bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH) coming in as well as out of wallets of victims via their clipboard.

Moreover, people who acquire the malicious application gain access to a web-based panel for handling all the actions that are required, including a “victim tracker panel.”

A detail that raises concerns about Palo Alto Networks is the fact that Westeal is said to be invulnerable to the most popular antivirus software.

The malware runs on the subscription model “Complexcodes,” the anon developer of the application earns money by charging 20 euros ($24) monthly for world market onion three months, 50 euro ($60) per month for 3 months and 150 euros ($150) each year.

The Malware Is a ‘Shameless’ Crypto Stealer, Researchers Say

The cybersecurity firm provides additional details about the malware:

“In in order to “steal” cryptocurrency from a victim, Westeal uses regular expressions to look for strings matching the patterns of bitcoin and ethereum wallet identifiers being copied to the clipboard. When it matches these, it replaces the copied wallet ID in the clipboard with one supplied by the malware. The victim then pastes the substituted wallet ID for a transaction, and the funds are sent instead to the substitute wallet.”

Still, Palo Alto Networks qualifies Westeal as a “shameless” malware:

“Westeal is a shameless piece of commodity malware with a single, illicit function. Its simplicity is matched by a likely simple effectiveness in the theft of cryptocurrency. The low-sophistication actors who purchase and deploy this malware are thieves, no less so than street pickpockets. Their crimes are as real as their victims. The fast and simple monetization chain and anonymity of cryptocurrency theft, together with the low cost and simplicity of operation, will undoubtedly make this type of crimeware attractive and popular to less-skilled thieves.”

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Australian IDs and credit cards are traded on the dark web for less than $20.

In less than the price of $20, cybercriminals could siphon off all the money you have in your account.

Personal information that is stolen from inexperienced Australians and could be used in many crimes and is currently available online on dark web for not much more than McDonald’s Big Mac meal, researchers claim.

Cybercriminals are able to steal fullz which is the term utilized on the dark web to describe someone’s complete credentials – and then use them to engage in identity fraud such as opening new lines of credit in the victim’s name, taking control of accounts, taking cash from banks and other felony.

Researchers from Comparitech an online security company, analyzed more than 40 dark web marketplaces to see the prices that identities and bundles of fullz were sold for.

A fullz bundle will usually include a national identity number and name, as well as date of birth, driver’s license number, bank statement, utility bills and sometimes scanning of passports or licenses.

Americans had the lowest price for fullz, averaging just $10.50 per record.

Australian accused of running world market darknet‘s largest darknet market was convicted

An Australian man accused of running the largest illegal marketplace on the darknet has been detained in Europe.

The website, which is known as DarkMarket was shut down this morning, German prosecutors said.

Forgeries, drugs theft or forgery of credit cards, untraceable phones SIM cards, malware and even malware are among items offered for sale there Prosecutors claim.

The suspect operator is a 34-year-old Australian man, was detained near the German-Danish border.

Prosecutors claim that a judge ordered his detention pending possible formal charges, and he’s yet to provide any information to investigators.

Australian police cooperated with German investigators during their month-long investigation, working alongside US, British, Danish, Swiss, Ukrainian and Moldovan law enforcement.

A Australian Federal Police (AFP) spokesperson stated that the agency was “working closer than ever” with European authorities to fight dark web and and organised crime threats impacting Australia.

AFP warning about the exploding number of child exploitation incidents during the coronavirus pandemic

Australian Federal Police Commissioner, Reece Kershaw, has said to parents that it’s crucial to be aware of the activities their kids are up to online , amid a flurry of child exploitation cases during this coronavirus outbreak.

The commissioner who has been on his position for 12 months, says his officers are encountering a massive spike instances child grooming, as well as incidences of extortion, in which they are manipulated into sending photos to predators via the internet.

Mr. Kershaw has revealed to 9News that the AFP is sifting through millions of disturbing photos and videos, especially those on the Dark Web.

But it’s not just the unknown recesses online that pose the risk.

Mr. Kershaw warns that seemingly innocent websites such as TikTok and Facebook are not safe and can easily present an hazard to those who aren’t careful.

He also warned that criminals would be able to commit crimes in impunity when Facebook proceeds with plans for completely encrypted messaging. This will block any investigation by police agencies.

National IDs of More Than 1 Lakh Indians Have Ended Up On The Dark Web: All The Details Here

More than 1 lakh scans of Indians national IDs, comprising Aadhaar, PAN card and passport, have been put on the dark web for sale, cyber intelligence company Cyble disclosed on Wednesday. The data leaked appears to have come from a third-party source and not the government’s systems, according to a report by Cyble.

“We came across a non-reputed actor who is currently selling over 1 lakh Indian National IDs on the dark net. With such a low reputation, ideally, we would have skipped this; however, the samples shared by the actor intrigued our interest — and also the volume. The actor is alleged to have access to over 1 lakh IDs from different places in India,” Cyble claimed. The personal data leaked by cybercriminals could lead to illicit activities like identity thefts, scams and corporate spying. A lot of criminals make use of the private information on IDs to gain the trust of those who make a call to commit fraud.

The Cyble researchers gathered around 1000 IDs through the vendor, and confirmed that the scanned IDs belonged to Indians. “Preliminary analysis suggests that the data originated from a third party, and no indication or artefact is indicating that it came from a government system. At this point, Cyble researchers are still investigating this further — we are hoping to share an update soon,” Cyble explained.

The ID documents scanned by the scanner indicate that the information could be leaked from a company’s data base in the segment where they have to conform to ‘Know Your Customer’ (KYC) norms. “Cyble researchers have also learned about a surge in KYC and banking scams — leaks such as this are often used by scammers to target individuals, especially elderlies,” Cyble said.

The cyber intelligence company has advised people to stay away from sharing personal information especially financial details via phone, e-mail or SMS. “Regularly monitor your financial transaction, if you notice any suspicious transaction, contact your bank immediately,” the firm advised.

The month of May saw Cyble revealed two cases where personal information that included 7.65 crore Indians have been put on auction on the dark web. In one case, the seller claimed to have collected data on 4.75 crore Indians through the online directory Truecaller and in other, the seller claimed to have sourced data from job websites. Truecaller, however, had denied that there was a breach in its database.

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Deer.io takedown: Russian citizen jailed for selling stolen sensitive information of US citizens online

A Russian citizen may be jailed for 30 months for his role in selling stolen debit card information along with other data helpful to fuel further criminal activity.

Kirill Victorovich Firsov, 30, from Moscow, acted for the reason that administrator of an internet site that provided stolen personal data and other services to be played with for cybercrime, a US Department of Justice release states.

One-stop cybercrime platform

As previously reported by The Daily Swig, the now-defunct website – Deer.io – hosted an estimated 2,000 illicit internet vendors making it approximately $17 million during its seven-year operation.

It sold information including gamer account logins, as well as personal information of US citizens not limited to names, current addresses, contact numbers, and world market darknet at times Social Security numbers.

Deer.io was released since October 2013 and was shut down following Firsov’s arrest in March 2020 after an operation where the FBI purchased 1,100 gamer accounts and the personal data for upwards of 3,600 Americans.

The prosecutor asserted that Firsov knew deer.io was selling stolen and counterfeit accounts because he built the platform.

“Also, deer.io was easily searchable, so anyone – including Firsov – could search prestashop for stolen US accounts and knowledge,” the making reads.

“Though it sold stolen accounts, deer.io had not been cloaked in secrecy and required no special password for access, because everything was deplete all of your Russia, and American the police could gain no foothold.”

‘Sending a message’

“The FBI will pursue cybercriminals across the globe,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge, Suzanne Turner.

“Today’s sentence sends a message – conducting criminal activity from external the United States doesn’t mean you might be out of reach.

“The FBI will identify and pursue criminal actors inside the cyber-sphere, where ever they operate, and try to bring these to justice inside a United States court.”

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Deer.io takedown: Russian citizen jailed for selling stolen personal information of US citizens online

A Russian citizen may be jailed for 30 months for his role in selling stolen debit card information along with data used to fuel further criminal activity.

Kirill Victorovich Firsov, 30, from Moscow, acted because the administrator of a website that provided stolen private information and various services to be utilized for cybercrime, a US Department of Justice release states.

One-stop cybercrime platform

As previously reported by The Daily Swig, the now-defunct website – Deer.io – hosted around 2,000 illicit internet retailers making approximately $17 million during its seven-year operation.

It sold information including gamer account logins, as well as the private data of US citizens not restricted to names, current addresses, contact numbers, at times Social Security numbers.

Deer.io was launched since October 2013 and was turn off following Firsov’s arrest in March 2020 after an operation when the FBI purchased 1,100 gamer accounts and the private information for more than 3,600 Americans.

The prosecutor asserted that Firsov knew deer.io was selling stolen and counterfeit accounts as he built the platform.

“Also, deer.io was easily searchable, so anyone – including Firsov – could search the woking platform for stolen US accounts and knowledge,” the production reads.

“Eventhough it sold stolen accounts, deer.io wasn’t cloaked in secrecy and required no special password for access, because everything was exhaust Russia, and American police force could gain no foothold.”

‘Sending a message’

“The FBI will pursue cybercriminals around the world Market url (https://wiki.berkeleymorris.Org/User:ZacharyTrost27),” said FBI Special Agent in Charge, Suzanne Turner.

“Today’s sentence sends a message – conducting criminal activity from outside the United States doesn’t imply that you are away from reach.

“The FBI will identify and pursue criminal actors inside cyber-sphere, wherever they operate, and work to bring those to justice in the United States court.”

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US authorities are offering $10 million for info on nation-state cyber-attacks

US authorities are offering as much as $10 million in cryptocurrency for information leading to the identification of state-sponsored cyber-attackers.

Beneath the scheme, which happens beneath the Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program, payouts will be awarded for the identity or location of anybody who, “while acting at the direction or underneath the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against US critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

A press release states that violations include threats made during ransomware attacks, unauthorized access to a protected computer with intention to steal sensitive data, and intentionally causing damage without authorization to a protected computer.

This system has setup a reporting channel accessible on the dark web to greatly help protect the safety and security of potential sources.

“Reward payments may include payments in cryptocurrency,” said the Department of State.

More information on how best to access the Tor-based reporting channel is found in the release.

In the pipeline

The offer of an incentive comes since the US continues to see cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure which have caused chaos throughout the nation.

In May in 2020, a ransomware attack on gas supplier Colonial Pipeline take off services to multiple states on the east coast.

Attackers leveraging DarkSide malware demanded $4.3 million in bitcoin – a sum that has been reportedly paid out by the company.

Security professionals previously told The Daily Swig that in paying ransoms, organizations risk perpetuating a “feedback loop of malicious activity” that “allows the groups to reach a larger degree of sophistication during their next attacks, world market onion (ghtmadcxt.preview.infomaniak.website) whether that be via training, new tooling, purchasing credentials, or recruitment.

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US authorities are offering $10 million for informative data on nation-state cyber-attacks

US authorities are offering up to $10 million in cryptocurrency for information ultimately causing the identification of state-sponsored cyber-attackers.

Under the scheme, which happens beneath the Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program, payouts will undoubtedly be awarded for the identity or location of anybody who, “while acting at the direction or beneath the control of a foreign government, participates in malicious cyber activities against US critical infrastructure in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

A media release states that violations include threats made during ransomware attacks, unauthorized usage of a protected computer with intention to steal sensitive data, and intentionally causing damage without authorization to a protected computer.

The program has set up a reporting channel accessible on the dark web to greatly help protect the safety and security of potential sources.

“Reward payments may include payments in cryptocurrency,” said the Department of State.

Additional information on the best way to access the Tor-based reporting channel are available in the release.

In the pipeline

The offer of an incentive comes whilst the US continues to have cyber-attacks against critical infrastructure that have caused chaos throughout the nation.

In May this year, a ransomware attack on gas supplier Colonial Pipeline cut off services to multiple states on the east coast.

Attackers leveraging DarkSide malware demanded $4.3 million in bitcoin – a sum which was reportedly paid out by the company.

Security professionals previously told The Daily Swig that in paying ransoms, organizations risk perpetuating a “feedback loop of malicious activity” that “allows the groups to achieve a better degree of sophistication throughout their next attacks, whether that be via training, new tooling, purchasing credentials, world market onion or recruitment.

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Kaseya denies ransomware payment since it hails ‘100% effective’decryption tool

Kaseya has denied rumors that it paid a ransom to the REvil cybercrime gang because it continues to roll out a decryptor to victims of a recently available ransomware attack.

The program supply chain attack, which began on July 2, is believed to have affected up to 1,500 organizations via the hack of IT management platform Kaseya VSA.

Kaseya revealed on July 22 so it had obtained a decryption tool from a “third party” and was working to restore the environments of impacted organizations with assistance from anti-malware experts Emsisoft.

Speculation

The update sparked speculation regarding identity of the unnamed 3rd party, with Allan Liska of Recorded Future’s CSIRT team positing a disgruntled REvil affiliate, the Russian government, or that Kaseya themselves had paid the ransom.

The theory that the universal decryptor key became available as a result of police action was strengthened on July 13 once the dark web domains connected with REvil abruptly went offline.

However, some experts also said it was likely that this was a prelude to REvil, whose other notable scalps include Travelex and meat supplier JBS, rebranding itself in a bid to dodge law enforcement.

Non-disclosure agreement

The cybercrime outfit was believed to have initially demanded a payment of $70 million from Kaseya, before lowering the price tag to $50 million.

Kaseya, which includes reportedly granted organizations access to the decryptor world market darknet contingent on signing a non-disclosure agreement, addressed rumors that it had paid a ransom in a statement yesterday (July 26):

Recent reports have suggested that our continued silence on whether Kaseya paid the ransom may encourage additional ransomware attacks, but nothing could possibly be further from our goal. While each company must make a unique decision on whether to pay for the ransom, Kaseya decided after consultation with experts never to negotiate with the criminals who perpetrated this attack and we have not wavered from that commitment. As a result, we are confirming in no uncertain terms that Kaseya didn’t pay a ransom – either directly or indirectly through an alternative party – to acquire the decryptor.

Kaseya said that “the decryption tool has proven 100% able to decrypting files that have been fully encrypted in the attack&rdquo ;.

It added: “We continue to provide the decryptor to customers that request it, and we encourage all our customers whose data could have been encrypted during the attack to reach out to your contacts at Kaseya&rdquo ;.

More zero-days

A week ago, meanwhile, security researchers from the organization that unearthed the zero-day Kaseya vulnerabilities exploited by REvil disclosed a trio of additional zero-day flaws in another Kaseya product.

The Dutch Institute for Vulnerability Disclosure (DIVD) advised users of cloud-based Kaseya Unitrends, which is available as an add-on for Kaseya VSA, to not expose the service to the net until a patch was released.

Also last week, Huntress Labs released a post speculating on why the compromise of 60 upstream, managed supplier customers using a fake software update hadn’t had much more calamitous consequences.

Dismissing the idea that Kaseya’s system shutdown was the primary reason, security researcher John Hammond pondered, among other potential reasons, whether threat actors had learned “from previous incidents (like Colonial Pipeline) that a much larger impact might invite government intervention?”